Jay Costantino | Abington Real Estate, Whitman Real Estate, Weymouth Real Estate



A transitional bathroom is a popular design trend that is a cross between modern and traditional. What are the key features of a transitional bathroom?

  • A combination of two styles: A transitional bathroom can have different meanings to different people. Usually, it is a mixture of a recent era with the current era. It boasts of clean lines, with a warm and comfortable design.

  • Easy to access: A transitional bathroom also refers to a design that gives homeowners safety and accessibility. Grab bars installed near the bathtub or shower are installed as much for style as they are for safety. Handheld shower sprays and bench seats are common additions as well as mirrors and other fixtures placed low for use from a seating position or a wheelchair.

  • Safe but stylish: A transitional bathroom is visually appealing and can make you feel safe and comfortable regardless of your physical ability or age. The grabs bars in a transitional bathroom are decorative and at the same time can prevent a fall. A built-in bench within a shower stall can serve as a seat if you are unable to stand due to injury or a foot prop for shaving your legs. Also, the handheld showers will come handy if you wish to bathe seated, wash your pet, or clean the shower.

  • Sleek design: The sheer beauty of a transitional bathroom is one reason it is so popular. They offer luxurious space where you can relax and unwind without the expense or inconvenience of leaving your home.

  • Storage and workspace: The vanity and cabinets in transitional bathrooms are distinctive. They are free-standing or built-in, with recessed panels and several drawers. The transitional bathroom incorporates painted wood with decorative hardware.

  • Countertops and sinks: In a transitional bathroom, the countertop, sinks, and faucet tend to be granite, marble, quartz, or quartzite. A transitional bathroom uses the newest faucet design trend like motion and touch-control. Popular finishes for transitional bathrooms include matte, polished, and satin.

  • Colors and flooring: Flooring options for transitional bathrooms might be stone tile, ceramic, porcelain, luxury vinyl, marble, or wood. On colors, transitional bathrooms have a light and soft feel: whites, grays, beiges, blues, and silvers are the most common color choices. 

If you looking to incorporate transitional style into your bathroom, contact your local interior designer for more ideas and cost estimates. If you’re looking to sell, ask your realtor if upgrading to a transitional bath is a potential selling point.


If your initial offer to purchase a home is countered, there is no need to stress. In fact, there are lots of reasons why you should negotiate with a house seller, and these include:

1. You can speed up the homebuying journey.

The homebuying journey may prove to be long and complicated. If you find a house you want to buy, however, there is no need to wait to submit an offer to purchase this home. And if a seller wants to negotiate with you, it may be worthwhile to work with this individual so you can acquire your ideal house.

A homebuying negotiation enables you to try to reach a house purchase agreement with a seller. Plus, if you and a seller cannot come to terms, you can always reenter the housing market and continue to search for another home that matches your expectations.

2. You can find common ground with a home seller.

When it comes to buying a home, it is important to avoid submitting a "lowball" offer to purchase. If a buyer submits a lowball property buying proposal, he or she risks alienating a seller. Worst of all, a seller may be more likely than ever before to reject the buyer's proposal and move forward with other offers to purchase.

Thanks to a homebuying negotiation, you can come to terms on a home purchase agreement that works well for both you and a seller. As a result, both you and a seller will be satisfied with the final terms of a home purchase agreement.

3. You can pay the lowest price for your dream home.

If you feel a seller's initial asking price is too high, negotiating with this individual offers an excellent opportunity to get the best price for your ideal house. And if you open up negotiations with a seller, you could acquire a terrific house at a budget-friendly price.

Of course, it is crucial to consider the seller's perspective during a homebuying negotiation. If you maintain constant communication with a seller, both you and this individual can work together to finalize a home purchase contract.

Negotiating with a home seller may be stressful, regardless of whether you are buying a house for the first time or have purchased residences in the past. Fortunately, if you hire a real estate agent, you can receive expert support as you negotiate a home purchase.

A real estate agent is happy to negotiate with a house seller on your behalf. He or she will keep you up to date throughout a home purchase negotiation. Best of all, a real estate agent will do everything possible to help you purchase your dream house at the lowest price.

For those who want to achieve the optimal results during the homebuying journey, it generally is a good idea to negotiate with a seller. If you are willing to negotiate with a seller, you could acquire your dream home faster than ever before.


This Single-Family in Scituate, MA recently sold for $540,000. This Colonial style home was sold by Jay Costantino - Costantino Realty Group.


36 Vernon Rd, Scituate, MA 02066

Single-Family

$569,000
Price
$540,000
Sale Price

9
Rooms
5
Beds
2/1
Full/Half Baths
A rare offering of a 5 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath colonial in a large, established neighborhood in the beautiful West End of Scituate. Lovingly maintained by one family, this home is ready for a fresh look, fresh faces and those who see value in sweat equity and adding personal touches. Surrounded by higher priced homes, this home sits on almost 1 acre, boasts a large yard, storage shed and screened in porch to enjoy the view and quiet of the outdoors. Great bones and updates: natural gas cooking and heat, chimney re-pointed 2018, roof 2017, boiler/ hot water heater 2016, 200A electric 2016, exterior painted 2015, septic 2007 with Title V PASS 10/19. The West End offers excellent access for all nature enthusiasts: the trail of the Bates Lane Conservation Area/Carl Pipes Trail/ Litchfield Trail, Mt. Hope Society, many road/bike races and minutes from Wampatuck State Park. Close to excellent schools, 3A, 53, commuter train/boat, local shops, beaches. South Shore gem. Easy to show!

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This Single-Family in Abington, MA recently sold for $393,000. This Colonial style home was sold by Jay Costantino - Costantino Realty Group.


96 Lincoln Street, Abington, MA 02351

Single-Family

$389,900
Price
$393,000
Sale Price

6
Rooms
3
Beds
2
Baths
Immaculate 3-bedroom antique colonial situated on a corner lot in a desirable Abington location. Eat-in kitchen with quartz countertops, garbage disposal and new stainless steel appliances. Hardwood floors throughout the entire first level. Antique charm with many newer updates including Roof (2018), Oil Tank (2018), Stainless Steel Appliances (2018), Harvey Windows (2017), White Vinyl Fence (2017), Hot Water Tank. Mass Save has insulated entire home. Updated first floor bathroom. Second floor features 3 bedrooms including master bathroom with walk-in shower. Enjoy your morning coffee in the sun-filled, heated, enclosed porch. Close to all area amenities including the brand new Abington Middle/High School. Easy access to route 18 & 139 and only 2 miles away from both the Abington & Weymouth Commuter Rail. Move in and make this home your own for under $400k! All offers due by Monday, January 27th at 7pm. Please allow 24hrs for response

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Getting a professional inspection is one of the most important parts of closing on a home. An inspection can save you endless time and money if it catches repairs that need to be made, and it can draw your attention to any problems that could be dangerous to you and your family.

Many buyers, especially those who are buying a home for the first time, aren’t sure what to expect during a home inspection. They might have questions that they’re afraid to ask the inspector, or they might feel like they should be asking questions but don’t know the right ones to ask.

In this article, we’ll give you the rundown on the home inspection process. We’ll explain how to get started, what to expect on inspection day, and what to do with your findings.

Contingency clauses

Before closing on a home, it’s important to make sure your offer involves a contingency clause, otherwise known as a “due diligence contingency.” This section of your contract gives you the right to perform a home inspection within a given number of days.

Sellers may inform you that they have recently had the home inspected and even offer to show you the results of the inspection. However, it is best practice to have your own inspection performed with a trusted professional.

After your offer is accepted, you should begin calling and getting quotes from inspectors immediately.

Before the inspection

Once you’ve considered your options of inspectors and chosen an inspector, it’s time to schedule your inspection. Both you and your real estate agent should attend the inspection.

You’ll both have the opportunity to ask questions. However, it’s a good idea to write down your minor questions and ask them before or after the inspection so that the professional you’ve hired is able to focus on their work to do the best possible job inspecting your future home.

During the inspection

The inspection itself is pretty straightforward. Your inspector will examine the exterior and interior of your home, including several vital components and then will provide you with a report of their findings.

They will inform you of repairs that need to be made now, parts of the home that should be monitored for future repairs, and anything that poses a safety concern to you and your family.

The parts of your home the inspector will review include:

  • Roof

  • Exterior Walls

  • Foundation

  • Garage

  • Land grading

  • Plumbing

  • Electrical

  • Heating, ventilation, air conditioning

  • Appliances

There are some things your inspection won’t include. For example, mold, termite damage, and other issues that aren’t easily observable without causing damage might be missed by your inspector and will require a specialist.

After the inspection

Once the inspection is complete, you will have the chance to ask any remaining questions. You can review the findings of your inspection report and make decisions about how you want to handle any repairs that need to be made.

You may choose to ask the seller to make the repairs noted in your inspection report. If they refuse, you can withdraw from your contract at any time.


Ultimately, the choice will be yours what to do with the findings from the inspection. But having one can save you immeasurable money on impending repairs that you may not have been aware of.




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